The Great Sunflower Harvest

Sunflowers are a wonderful plant and one of my favorites in the garden. They’re truly a multipurpose plant! They provide delicious seeds that are super healthy and can be pressed to make sunflower oil, they are great at attracting bees and other pollinators to your garden, they make great poles for peas or beans to climb and they are so cheerful looking that they can brighten the darkest day.

But, the number one reason that I grow them is because they are one of the quickest growing plants available that can provide 2 of the most important components to a successful desert garden: afternoon shade, and wind protection. When sunflowers are planted along the southern border of the garden, they provide the valuable dappled afternoon shade that nearly all vegetable crops need and a gentle break against our arid “blow dryer” winds.

There are countless different varieties of sunflower to choose from in a range of heights, from “Elves” which is a dwarf variety to “Mammoth” which is a giant variety. They come in a range of colors and petal patterns and some form a single head while others form multiple flower heads on one stalk.  All are equally easy to grow. I grow the “Mammoth” variety because I figure, if you are going to do something, do it big!

Two of my sunniest flowers!

You can plant sunflowers in the Sonoran Desert February through October. Mine survived all the frosts like champs this year. I think the reason for this is that they were at least 6 feet tall before the first frost and since cold air sinks, they were tall enough to make it. If you plant them late, they may be more susceptible to frost, and shorter or dwarf varieties may be more tender. The good news is, if they get killed by frost, they sprout and grow quickly from seed, so you can try again after the last danger of frost.

You may need to stake super tall varieties like “Mammoth” especially after deep watering or rain because their large heads will get heavy. Once you can see that the seeds have formed on the flower heads, wait a few weeks for the heads to turn downward and for the green disks at the back of the flower to start to yellow, and then you can cut the flower head off and allow it to dry on your porch or inside. Once the flower is dry, you can shake out all the sunflower seeds and roast them for eating, save some for replanting and probably still have plenty to share with the wild birds.

Sunflower heads laying out to dry

I use my large serrated bread knife to cut off the flowers for drying.

I have no idea what I am going to do with all those sunflower seeds!!! I have enough to plant the back 40 in sunflowers! Well, hope you try sunflowers in your desert garden!

Here’s lookin’ at you kid!

See no evil!